Roleplaying Club Info

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Roleplaying Club Info

Post  azer on Wed Jun 23, 2010 9:32 am

Ok, so I got in touch with Mrs Ferris, and she said that "Once the school year is underway, an announcement will be made for students to submit requests for clubs - in conjunction with clubs that are already in existence."

If things do not work out, I will probably still run a roleplaying club from home, but I hope that the new club will work at school.

In the meantime, I will shortly be posting the beta rules for my roleplaying system (based on FUDGE), and I would welcome all criticism and feedback you have to offer.


Last edited by azer on Tue Jul 27, 2010 9:40 pm; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Roleplaying Club Info

Post  azer on Wed Jul 28, 2010 8:38 pm

Ok, I will be posting this in parts, so first up is some basic information about Sundon, my world.

The planet of Sundon is spherical, rotates around the yellow star Urt (ert), and revolves on a central axis. The revolutional time for the planet is roughly 22 hours. 4 hours of these are daylight, the other 18 being night. A full rotation of Urt takes 500 revolutions. Due to the level of darkness over light, most of the species living on Sundon are able to see in the infrared spectrum, as well as in normal light. Indeed, only the Pajun actively seek light and decorate their cities with lanterns and candles. Sundon has no orbiting celestial body, meaning that there are no tides in the oceans; wind and manpower are the sole means of sea propulsion. Gravity is slightly less on Sundon than on Earth, to the extent that most creatures can fall up to 20 feet without serious injury.
The sapient races of Sundon are diverse and varied, being much more varied than humans. The two most common races on Sundon are the Pajun and Najun. Only a cursory examination of these two species is necessary to determine that they are from the same evolutionary stock; however, they have grown into two distinct subspecies. In fact, there is evidence that the Najun were the original stock and the Pajun evolved as a group of outcasts who left the Najun two follow new gods and adapt a new way of life. The Pajun are much like Earth’s humans in general size and shape, the only major differences being that Pajun can see in infrared, and are generally more stocky of build than modern humans, even the females. The Pajun alone among the races of Sundon love light; placing numerous lamps and candles in their cities and worshiping the sun-god Haija. They prefer to be active during the few daylight hours, and prefer sleep during the darkness hours. In fact, their love of light borders on illogicality, as they do not need it to see, but they seem to have an inborn desire to “see in the light,” as it were. The Pajun have a love of their great, man-made cities, which many consider the cultural centers of the world. Almost anything can be found in a Pajun city, and they are indeed incredible to behold for the first time. Pajun culture also places a great value on masculinity, and woman are somewhat oppressed in the same way that they have been for most of Earth’s history. Pajun have a history of numerous and bloody wars, and it was only with the event of the Guernon Pact some 70 years before the events of this narrative that they were convinced to stop their infighting. Their civilization is much smaller than that of the Najun, and many Pajun can be found mingles in Najun cities. The Pajun enjoy art, and their race has produced many great singers and painters.
The other subspecies of this race is the Najun, a race that is less similar to humans than the Pajun. The Najun are grey-skinned, an evolutionary measure to help them hide in the dark, and have almost unsurpassed infrared vision. They are much less strong than Pajun, the strongest Najun is only as strong as a Pajun with average strength; but they are generally more agile, preferring stealth to brute force. The Najun have a collection of semidemocratic monarchies, with groups, or Intellectual Guilds of like minded social elite electing their own leaders. Najun Guild infighting does not occur in the form of massive armies fighting on plains, but with small elite groups of warriors dueling for supremacy (an approach generally agreed to be less costly in life). The Najun have always had gender equality, and many females are included among their greatest warriors. In Najun culture, however, scientific ability is values over combat skills, and theirs are the greatest intellectuals of Sundon. The Najun place little value on gold, silver, and ornamentation, instead preferring the practicality of simple clothes and homes. They generally eschew the arts, and generally see such things as frivolous. They are also unique in that they choose not to worship the various gods of the celestial pantheon, instead worshipping Ramal, the God above all Gods, who created the universe and all of the minor gods.
Another major race of Sundon is the Grum. The Grum are tall and strong, with stony and woody countenances that remind the viewer of natural phenomena. Although they can be immensely powerful fighters, most Grum have dedicated themselves to the betterment of others. They choose to use the considerable gifts granted to them for peace, not war, and have a worldview that somewhat resembles Earthen socialism. They have no possessions, share what they have freely, and view all life as their equals. They possess strength many times that of even the strongest Pajun. They are hard to kill by normal means, and only injury of a tremendous nature can fell them. They worship the nature goddess, Jarna, and can communicate with most animals.
The technology of Sundon resembles that of the Renaissance Age of Earth; iron is used as a main material, water and wind power are prevalent, and machines powered by cranks are common. Gliding machines that take advantage of the low gravity of Sundon are common, and are a preferred means of city transport. Medicine is rather basic, except among the Najun. Rudimentary guns have appeared, although they are inefficient and illegal; possession or use of one is a warrant for execution.
Some of the major organizations that influence the world of Sundon are the Gentleman’s League, the Fool’s Guild, the Witch-hunters, and the Mystics. The Gentleman’s League is a society mainly operating in the large Najun city of Harton that hides corruption, assassination, and illegal trade behind a mask of a casual, respectable scientific institute for the high-class enthusiast. Its members are guildless, and have been known to provide shady services to whoever will pay them. The Fool’s Guild (so called because all members see themselves and all of sentience as fools) is a secret organization known for it’s devotion to independent thought, it’s copiously accurate recordkeeping, it’s dabbling in minor magic, and the first-class illegality of membership. Anyone caught as a guild member is sure to be executed, as the other guilds fear it for its highly intelligent members and the insidious magical prowess of its agents. The Witch-hunters are not so much an official organization as they are many ‘chapters’ around Sundon, a group of dedicated like-minded fanatics who share a definition, devoted to the destruction of the Fool’s Guild; or, as they call them, “the Heretics.” Although most members of the Fool’s Guild are religious, the Witch-hunters see their structure and ideal as blasphemous, and will destroy them when possible. Although many of the political Guilds view them as overzealous, they will often hire local chapter members to root out suspected Fool’s guild members, as Witch-hunters are often frighteningly efficient in their methods. Mystics are a group of sages who live isolated lives in their towers trying to lock the elusive secrets of the Eldritch. They little visit the world outside their studies, and are a bit of an enigma to the outside, who see their work as pointless and inapplicable. Indeed, they often come into conflict with those who believe that science, not magic, is the way forward for mankind.

Next up: Introduction to the Sundon RPG


Last edited by azer on Wed Jul 28, 2010 8:39 pm; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Roleplaying Club Info

Post  azer on Wed Jul 28, 2010 8:39 pm

This is a game which, unlike many others, takes place almost entirely in the imagination of its players. Players take on the role of ‘player characters,’ or PC’s; heroes who have fantastic adventures in the world of Sundon. These characters may be whatever the player likes within the bounds of the world, from an elite soldier, to a magic-wielding member of the Fool’s Guild, to a peasant who spends his days traveling the forest singing songs to the trees and dreaming about fairies. The PC’s have their adventures within a story created by the Game Master, or GM; a referee who presents the challenges the PC’s must face and enforces the rules of the game. One important aspect of a roleplaying game is that the rules are there to facilitate the actions of the players, not to restrict them, and a player may do whatever he/she likes within the boundaries of the world. For most actions where there is a significant chance of failure, such as attacking an opponent or picking a lock, 4 special six-sided dice, or FUDGE Dice, are rolled. FUDGE dice are six-sided dice with two sides marked +1, two sides marked -1, and two sides marked 0. To use FUDGE dice, simply roll four of them, and total the amount. Since a +1 and a -1 cancel each other, remove a +1 and -1 from the table, and the remaining two dice are easy to read no matter what they are. (Example: if you roll +1, +1, 0, -1, remove the -1 and one of the +1s, as together they equal 0. The remaining two dice, +1 and 0, are easily added to +1.) If there is no opposing pair of +1 and -1 dice, remove any 0s and the remaining dice are again easy to read. The result of a die roll is a number between -4 and +4. This resultant modifier is then used to push the end result of the roll being made up or down the Fudge Ladder:
Superb
Great
Good
Fair
Mediocre
Poor
Terrible
To determine the result of an action, simply put your finger on your trait level, then move it up (for plus results) or down (for minus results).
Example: Nathaniel, who has a Good Bow Skill, is shooting in an archery contest. The player rolls 4dF (4 Fudge Dice), using the procedure described above. If he rolls a 0, he gets a result equal to Nathaniel's skill: Good, in this case. If he rolls a +1, however, he gets a Great result, since Great is one level higher than his Good Archery skill. If he rolls a -3, unlucky Nathaniel has just made a Poor shot.

Next up: Character Creation.

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Re: Roleplaying Club Info

Post  azer on Wed Jul 28, 2010 8:40 pm

To create a character, first think of a concept that would fit within the world of Sundon. What type of person do you want to play? A thief? A fighter? A priest? Once you have a concept, think about your character’s physical and mental attributes. Is he/she strong? Nimble? Wise? Stupid?
The six attributes are:
• Reasoning: Thinking ability; puzzle-solving; intelligence; mental acuity
• Perception: Awareness of the environment; raw ability to notice things
• Willpower: Strength of will; psychic stamina; determination; guts
• Strength: Physical strength; lifting/carrying capacity; ability to deal damage
• Agility: Physical dexterity; adroitness; native talent for physical skills
• Health: Fitness; resistance to disease and injury; physical stamina
All attributes start at Fair. Each character may take two free attribute levels, either raising one attribute two levels, or two attributes one level each.
In addition, players may trade levels - that is, lower an attribute to Mediocre in order to raise one other attribute one level, and so on. Also, subject to GM approval, a character may raise an attribute by taking an additional Fault, or by foregoing one of the two free Gifts (explained later).
Conversely, a player may forego one of his free two attribute levels in order to take an extra Gift - again, subject to GM approval.
Attributes are not linked to skills in this game, except in the following sense: the player is encouraged to choose attribute levels which make sense, given his skill list. For example, three or more points spent between Combat, Scouting and Athletic skills means that the character would logically be above average in Strength, Agility, and/or Health. If the player decides not to raise at least one of these attributes above Fair, he should have a good story as to why they are abnormally low.
All Grum have one additional level of strength and constitution and one less level of reasoning and agility. All Najun have one less level of strength and one more level of agility. Pajun have no racial adjustments to ability.
Attributes are used for three things in the game:
1. As very broad skills. There will be times in which no particular skill listed in the rules is appropriate for the task the character is attempting. In these cases, the GM will choose the closest attribute and have the player roll versus the attribute (possibly at a penalty).
2. In certain opposed actions, such as attempting to sneak by a guard (Move Quietly skill vs. Perception attribute) or a swindle attempt (Con skill vs. Reasoning attribute) or an attempt to strangle someone (Strength attribute vs. Health attribute). The GM will think of other cases readily.
3. As a broad handle on who the character is. A high Reasoning, low Strength character has a different flavor from the opposite attribute levels.
Skills
After determining attributes, players should choose their character’s skills. These skills represent abilities and expertise picked up by the character during his/her life, and define what a character is good at.

There are eight skill groups (detailed later). Each skill group has 15 or more skills, of which the player may choose a certain number, based on the number of points spent in that skill group. Each character has five points to spend on various skill groups.
A player can spend his points in any of the groups that he chooses, up to four points in any one group. Each quantity of points spent provides a certain number of skills (of the player's choice) from the appropriate group, at the levels shown below:

Points Spent Skills in that Group,
in a Group at which Levels
-------------------------------------------------------
Broad Focus Narrow Focus
-------------------------------------------------------
1 3 at Fair 1 at Good
1 at Mediocre 1 at Mediocre
-------------------------------------------------------
2 2 at Good 1 at Great
4 at Fair 1 at Good
1 at Fair
-------------------------------------------------------
1 at Great
3 3 at Good
4 at Fair
------------------------------------------------
1 at Superb
2 at Great
4 3 at Good
3 at Fair
------------------------------------------------

Note that if you spend only 1 or 2 points in a skill group you can spend your points in either a broad or narrow focus. Because a character with too few skills may be weak in a given campaign, the GM may limit the number of points you can spend on narrowly focused skill groups. (Suggested limit: two points.)
Examples of point expenditure: if a player wishes his character to be a dabbler at Combat, he could spend one point on the Combat group. Using a broad focus, he could then choose any three Combat skills to list on his character sheet at Fair and any one at Mediocre. Using a narrow focus, he may choose any two Combat skills: one at Good and one at Mediocre.
Example 1: one point in Combat
One-handed Sword: Fair
Fast-draw Sword: Fair
Shield: Fair
Brawling: Mediocre
Example 2: a different way to spend one point in Combat
Spear: Fair
Throw Spear: Fair
Tactics: Fair
Knife: Mediocre
Example 3: one narrowly focused point in Combat
Bow: Good
One-handed Sword: Mediocre
If a player spends two points in a skill group, he can choose two skills at Good, and four more at Fair (using a broad focus), or one at Great, one at Good, and one at Fair (using a narrow focus).
Example 4: two points in Combat
One-handed Sword: Good
Fast-draw Sword: Good
Bow: Fair
Tactics: Fair
Brawling: Fair
Read Opponent: Fair
Example 5: two narrowly focused points in Social
Fast-talk: Great
Parley/Negotiate: Good
Camaraderie: Fair
And so on. The more points a player spends in a given skill group, the more his character gains both familiarity with a number of skills and greater expertise in some of those skills. For example, a Combat specialist is a professional soldier who will be an expert with a few weapons, but will have also used many other weapons over the course of his career.
The player may choose any skills within a given skill group, up to the number listed for the points spent. The player may decide which of those skills are at the listed levels. If the GM doesn't want a character to know a given skill, she should make sure the player understands this before character creation.
Thus there are thousands of player character types available in this system, yet all are easily customized to the player's desires. The possible combinations of spending five points are:

5 different skill groups: 1, 1, 1, 1, 1
4 different skill groups: 2, 1, 1, 1
3 different skill groups: 3, 1, 1 or 2, 2, 1
2 different skill groups: 4, 1 or 3, 2

General Skills Point
A player may spend a maximum of one point as a General Skills point. This means you may spend one point and take any three non-magic skills at Fair. These skills can be from two or three different skill groups, if desired (there is no point in taking them all from the same group). Note that a General Skills point does not get you as many skills as a broadly focused point (four), but more than a narrowly focused point (two).
Trading Skills
During character creation you may trade one skill for two skills of lesser value. Thus you could trade one Good skill for two Fair skills, or one Great skill for two Good skills. For example, spending two points in a skill group normally gets you 2 Good and 4 Fair skills. You could instead choose 2 Good, 3 Fair, and 2 Mediocre skills.
Skills involved in the trade must all be from the same skill group. Exception: with a General Skills point (see above), you can trade a Fair for two Mediocre skills from two different groups. Thus a character could take six Mediocre skills from six different groups with a General Skills point.
There are many ways to create a character. If you have a concept in mind, scan the skill lists that seem most likely to fit your character. For example, a fighter will obviously need to spend some points in Combat skills, and a thief in Covert skills.
Since you must spend points in at least two skill groups, try to think of what other skills, aside from the obvious, would be helpful - or perhaps simply fun - for your character to have.
If you don't have a concept in mind, then toy with skill group linkings. What would a Combat-Scouting combination look like? Probably a "Ranger." How about an Athletic-Covert? Hmm - a James Bond type, perhaps? Knowledge-Social - that might be a merchant or a diplomat, depending on the skills chosen. And so on - this is actually a fun pastime, even if you aren't making a character.
Once you've decided on which skill groups to choose from, jot down the most appealing skills in these groups. The number of skills you want from a given group will tell you how many points you need to spend in that skill group. For example, if only two or three skills appeal to you from a group, spending 1 or 2 narrowly focused points is sufficient. If you really want eight or ten skills all from the same group, you're creating a specialist character: you'll probably have to spend three or four points in that skill group to get that many skills. (Another way to get eight or ten skills, if you don't mind low skill levels, is to use the "trading skills" option, and expect to raise them later with experience points.) A "Jack of All Trades" character rarely spends more than two points in any one group, and is interested in skills from three or more different skill groups.
Once your skills are chosen, you can then set your attributes, Gifts, and Faults. At that point you'll easily be able to see what levels your attributes should logically be, and which Gifts and Faults would go most appropriately with your character.
The Skill Groups
Listed here are eight skill groups for a Fantasy setting. Following the lists is a comprehensive, alphabetical list of the skills, with descriptions and which skill group they appear in.
Note: although four of the skill groups have multiple titles, such as Athletic/Manual Dexterity Skills, for simplicity they are referred to outside this list by the first part of the title, such as Athletic Skills.
Skills marked with an asterisk (*) appear in more than one skill group. These may be learned by spending points in either skill group - there is no reason to learn the same skill from two different groups.
Athletic/Manual Dexterity Skills
Acrobatics/Tumbling Move Quietly *
Aerial Acrobatics Riding
Balance Running
Boating * Sleight of Hand
Climbing * Swimming
Equestrian Acrobatics Team Acrobatics
Juggling Throwing
Jumping Whittling
Knot-tying Various Sports
Combat Skills
Bow Pike
Brawling Quarterstaff
Club/Mace Read Opponent
Crossbow Shield
Fast-draw Sling
Flail Spear
Knife Spear Throwing
Knife Throwing Tactics
Lance Two-handed Axe
One-handed Axe Two-handed Sword
One-handed Sword
Parry (Other weapon skill approved by GM)
Covert/Urban Skills
Barroom Savvy * Move Quietly *
Climbing * Pick Locks
Detect Lies Pick Pockets
Detect Traps Poisons
Disarm Traps Shady Contacts
Disguise Streetwise
Find Hidden Tailing
Forgery Urban Survival
Infiltrate Ventriloquism
Lip reading
Knowledge Skills
Alchemy * Legal Process
Arcane Lore Legends/Stories
Area Knowledge Literacy *
Astrology Medicine
Botany Politics/International
Evaluate Goods Thaumatology *
First aid Theology/Myths/Rituals
Geography Veterinarian
Heraldry/Court Rituals Weather Sense
Herb Lore * Zoology
History Other fields of knowledge
Language (each is a separate skill)
Professional Skills **
Animal Handling Jeweler
Animal Training Leatherwork
Armorer Masonry
Artist Merchant
(each medium separate) Musician
Basketry (each instrument separate)
Bookkeeping Performing
Bowyer/Fletcher Pottery
Carpentry Seamanship
Cooking Shiphandling
Counseling/Priest Shopkeeping
Smithy
Dancing Tailor
Engineer Teaching
Falconry Teamster
Farming Theater
Gambling Weaving
Inn Keeping Many others possible...
Note: if a player spends 3 or 4 points in Professional Skills, he may claim skills from any skill group as part of his Professional skills, subject to GM approval. Not all skills will qualify! E.g., a 3-point Animal Handler can make a strong claim that Riding (Athletic) is in his Professional skill group, but an animal handler doesn't necessarily know any combat skills.
Scouting/Outdoor Skills
Boating * Mimic Animal Noises
Camouflage Move Quietly *
Camping Navigation
Fishing Observation
Herb Lore * Survival
Hide Traces Tracking
Hunting Trail Blazing
Map Sketching Woods Lore
Social/Manipulative Skills
Barroom Savvy * Intimidate
Barter/Haggle Lie/Pretense
Bluff Oratory
Camaraderie Parley/Negotiate
Con Persuade
Etiquette Repartee
Fast-talk Salesmanship
Flatter Savoir-Faire
Flirt/Vamp Storytelling
Interrogate
Skill Descriptions
This section contains an alphabetical list of all skills, including a brief description and which groups the skills appear in. Magic spells are listed separately - see Magic.
Defaults: Most skills default to Poor, so if a skill isn't listed on your character sheet, your character probably knows it at Poor. Certain skills, such as Magic, are an exception to this - they're not known at all if not listed on the character sheet. Other skills may have a default of Terrible or Mediocre. Skills which have a default other than Poor have the default listed in [brackets].
• Acrobatics/Tumbling: moving your body gracefully and successfully through difficult maneuvers, such as rolls, tumbles, leaps, springing to your feet, etc. (Athletic)
• Aerial Acrobatics: swinging from ropes, chandeliers, vines, trapezes, rigging, etc., safely and accurately. (Athletic)
• Alchemy: knowledge of and the ability to create elixirs and talismans of magical power. See Magic. [No default] (Knowledge, Magic)
• Animal Handling: managing animals in many situations. (Professional)
• Animal Training: training animals for specific tasks. (Professional)
• Arcane Lore: knowledge of occult things - otherworldly stories, legends, etc. (Knowledge)
• Area Knowledge: knowledge of a given area. The larger the area, the more shallow the knowledge. (Knowledge)
• Armorer: making, altering, and repairing armor. [Terrible] (Professional)
• Artist: creating aesthetically pleasing art in a given medium. Each medium is a separate skill. (Professional)
• Astrology: this is either simple astronomy or an actual potent forecasting and divination tool - ask the GM. (Knowledge)
• Balance: keeping one's equilibrium in awkward physical situations, such as tightrope walking, beam walking, crossing a stream on a log, etc. (Athletic)
• Barroom Savvy: like Urban Survival, but very specific to barrooms. (Social, Covert)
• Barter/Haggle: raising or reducing prices, depending on whether you're selling or buying. Opposed by the other person's Barter/Haggle skill. (Social)
• Basketry: making baskets and other woven products from bark, grasses, and other plant materials. Includes a knowledge of materials, market prices, etc. (Professional)
• Bluff: misleading people into thinking you will perform an action you have no intention of performing. Opposed by Reasoning. (Social)
• Boating: small boat handling. (Athletic, Scouting)
• Bookkeeping: knowledge of accounting practices - requires Literacy and some math ability. (Professional)
• Botany: broad knowledge of plants - their habitats, growing needs, uses, dangers, etc. See Herb Lore, Farming, Basketry, Poisons, etc., for more specific skills. (Knowledge)
• Bow: using and caring for a bow and arrows, either longbow or short bow. [Terrible] (Combat)
• Bowyer/Fletcher: making bows and arrows, including harvesting the appropriate material. [Terrible] (Professional)
• Brawling: fighting without weapons. (Combat)
• Camaraderie: being entertaining in social settings, such as at a bar, at a party, around a campfire, etc., which can gain someone's confidence and approval. (Social)
• Camouflage: blending in with your surroundings so you don't stand out. Primarily used in natural settings - use Disguise in urban settings. (However, a case could be made for using Camouflage skill to hide in an alley, for example.) (Scouting)
• Camping: similar to Survival, but requires some tools, such as blankets, pots, an axe, a tent, etc. In return, it allows greater comfort and quality of life in the wild. (Scouting)
• Carpentry: working with wood, to make anything from houses to furniture to cabinets. (Professional)
• Casting Skill: there is no one skill, just individual spells. See Magic. [No default]
• Climbing: climbing, either natural formations such as cliffs and trees, or man-made ones such as stone, brick, etc., (but not sheer) walls. (Athletic, Covert)
• Club/Mace: using a club or mace as a combat weapon. (Combat)
• Con: making people believe in some plan or product you are pushing. (Social)
• Cooking: preparing tasty and nourishing food. (Professional)
• Counseling/Priest: comforting the afflicted, restoring good emotional health, helping people through grief, etc. (Professional)
• Crossbow: using a crossbow effectively in combat. [Mediocre] (Combat)
• Dancing: dancing aesthetically. See Performing. (Professional)
• Detect Lies: telling when someone is lying. Opposed by Lies/Pretense. (Covert)
• Detect Traps: determining if a given area has a trap of some sort set, and what type. (Covert)
• Diplomacy: not a separate skill - see Parley/Negotiate
• Disarm Traps: deactivating a trap without harm. This may or may not cause noise, however ... (Covert)
• Disguise: passing for someone else under visual inspection. There is a penalty for serious inspection, of course. Opposed by Reasoning, though no roll is needed if the observer has no reason to be suspicious. (Covert)
• Engineer: designing and making tools, structures, sewer systems, etc. (Professional)
• Equestrian Acrobatics: performing acrobatic mounts, dismounts, trick riding, etc. This skill cannot be higher than your Riding skill. (Athletic)
• Etiquette: knowledge of good manners in any society, and the ability to carry them out. Not as specific as Savoir-Faire, but gives a broader base for knowledge. (Social)
• Evaluate Goods: a general skill to assess the value of something. It won't be as accurate as a specific Professional skill (for example, a Potter will be a better judge of Pottery than someone with this skill), but as a broad skill allows a good general knowledge. (Knowledge)
• Falconry: training and controlling a raptor for sport and hunting. (Professional)
• Farming: raising crops and/or livestock, and everything associated with that: soil preparation, planting, weeding, tending, harvest, drying, storage, markets, etc. (Professional)
• Fast-draw: readying a weapon for combat use effectively instantly. A different skill for each weapon, and some weapons cannot be fast-drawn. (Combat)
• Fast-talk: convincing someone of something, which, upon reflection, they may realize isn't true. Fast-talk doesn't create lasting belief - see the Con skill for that. Opposed by Reasoning. (Social)
• Find Hidden: locating concealed doors, compartments, catches, etc. (Covert)
• First aid: administering emergency medical treatment knowledgeably. (Knowledge)
• Fishing: catching fish for food, sale, barter, or sport. (Scouting)
• Flail: using a flail as a weapon. (Combat)
• Flatter: making people like you by complimenting them to the point they begin to trust your judgement. Opposed by Willpower. (Social)
• Flirt/Vamp: arousing sexual interest in an appropriate subject, for whatever reason. Opposed by Willpower. (Social)
• Forgery: making fake documents and/or signatures that look authentic. (Covert)
• Gambling: gaming for money. Note that some gambling includes games of skill, and others games of chance - this skill helps largely with the former, and knowledge of the latter, including a good estimate of the odds. Also the ability to cheat at games, and spot cheaters. (Professional)
• Geography: broader than Area Knowledge, Geography is the knowledge of general topography, terrain nature, biomes, etc. (Knowledge)
• Heraldry/Court Rituals: knowledge of signs, symbols, and devices used to denote rank and family of the nobility. Also knowledge of court rituals, such as how many trumpet calls to announce a king as opposed to a duke, etc. (Knowledge)
• Herb Lore: knowledge of, preparation of, dosage of, and dangers of using herbs as medicinal agents. While it may tell you which herbs to avoid, this skill does not go into specific poisons - see Poisons for that skill. See Botany for a broader knowledge of plants. (Scouting, Knowledge)
• Hide Traces: hiding any traces that people or animals used an area. This includes hiding tracks as well as camping areas. (Scouting)
• History: knowledge of historical figures and events. This can be a broad and shallow skill, such as World History, or a narrower and deeper skill, such as history of a specific state. (Knowledge)
• Hunting: hunting and killing animals for food, hides, sport, or whatever. (Scouting)
• Infiltrate: slipping into a guarded camp, either by pretending to have a right to be there or simply by avoiding all contact. (Covert)
• Inn Keeping: the knowledge of running a hotel or inn: includes kitchen, bar-keeping, maid service, stable, etc. (Professional)
• Interrogate: extracting information from an unwilling subject. There are two basic types of interrogators: those who get their subjects to trust them, and those who psychologically abuse them. Chose one type. Opposed by Willpower. (Social)
• Intimidate: psychologically brow beating someone else into doing your will. Does not involve any physical component. Opposed by Willpower. (Social)
• Jeweler: making and evaluating jewelry. Includes assessment of gems, gold, silver, etc. (Professional)
• Juggling: juggling anything you can lift. See also Performing. (Athletic)
• Jumping: jumping for distance and accuracy. (Athletic)
• Knife: using a knife in combat, but not necessarily to throw it. (Combat)
• Knife Throwing: throwing a knife accurately and with force. (Combat)
• Knot-tying: tying functional and/or ornamental knots for various purposes. [Mediocre] (Athletic)
• Lance: using a lance (a type of hand-held spear used from horseback). Does not include the Riding skill. (Combat)
• Language: speaking and understanding a language. Every character knows their native language well at no cost - take this skill to learn foreign languages. Each language learned is a separate skill. [No default, or may default to similar language] (Knowledge)
• Leatherwork: working with leather - includes tanning, preparation, tooling, sewing, etc. (Professional)
• Legal Process: knowledge of legal matters. [Terrible] (Knowledge)
• Legends/Stories: knowledge of legends and stories, either as a source for entertainment, wisdom, or clues to treasure hunting, etc. (Knowledge)
• Lie/Pretense: dissembling your true intentions, origins, or role from others. Opposed by Detect Lies. (Social)
• Lip reading: seeing what people are saying by watching their lips move. (Covert)
• Literacy: reading and writing. (Knowledge, Magic)
• Map Sketching: creating reasonably accurate and readable maps from observation. (Scouting)
• Masonry: working with stone. (Professional)
• Medicine: diagnosing and treating injuries and diseases in humans and other sentient beings. (Knowledge)
• Merchant: broad knowledge of what it takes to be in the business of selling or trading, either retail or wholesale. (Professional)
• Mimic Animal Noises: making a noise which sounds like a specific animal. (Scouting)
• Move Quietly: moving without attracting attention. Opposed by Perception. (Athletic, Covert, Scouting)
• Musician (each instrument separate): mastery of an instrument (which may be voice). See Performing. (Professional)
• Navigation: finding your way based on the stars, position of the sun, map-reading, etc. (Scouting)
• Observation: trained ability to notice and remember things - conscious application of Perception and memory. The player's notes are the character's memory. (Scouting)
• One-handed Axe: using small axes as combat weapons. (Combat)
• One-handed Sword: using any sword designed to be used with one hand. (Combat)
• Oratory: keeping the focus of a group of people through speaking, and attempting to sway them to your point of view. Opposed by group's average Reasoning-1. (Social)
• Parry: Block attacks.
• Parley/Negotiate: reaching a compromise solution. (Social)
• Performing: stage presence - actively entertaining people. You'll need another skill to actually entertain with, such as Juggler, Storyteller, Musician, etc. A musician without the Performing skill may be skilled at producing music, but lacks "audience connection" and won't be as popular as a musician with good Performing skill. (Professional)
• Persuade: convincing an individual of your point of view. Opposed by Reasoning. (Social)
• Pick Locks: opening locks without the correct key. Penalty of -1 with improvised lockpicks. Difficult locks may have an additional penalty. (Covert)
• Pick Pockets: removing items from an individual's pockets, belt, purse, etc., without them noticing it. Opposed by Perception. [Terrible] (Covert)
• Pike: using a very long hand-held spear as a weapon - most useful in formations, especially against cavalry. (Combat)
• Poisons: knowledge, use, preparation, and dosage of various poisons. (Covert)
• Politics/International: knowledge of the international situation in a given area, and of the internal politics of states within that area. May be for a broad area, such the entire known world, or a more focused area, such as Europe. In the latter case, the knowledge is more detailed. (Knowledge)
• Pottery: making pots, plates, bowls, etc., from clay. Includes the ability to assess the value of other potters' work, knowledge of good clay sources, etc. (Professional)
• Read Opponent: roughly estimating a given opponent's skill level in combat. An exceptionally good result may even reveal a particular combat "style," if appropriate for the setting. (Combat)
• Repartee: delivering witty sayings, usually double entendres, which cannot be construed as libelous but carry hidden insults or stings. (Social)
• Riding: riding and controlling a horse (or other riding animal - specify) comfortably, safely, and with precision. (Athletic)
• Running: you practice a lot - better speed than non- runners, as well as distance. (Athletic)
• Salesmanship: selling someone something. Opposed by Willpower. (Social)
• Savoir-Faire: functioning smoothly, without social blunders, in any upper or middle class setting. (Social)
• Seamanship: assisting in any task on a large sailing vessel. (Professional)
• Shady Contacts: knowledge of the underworld, or, in a strange city, at least general underworld habits and likeliest places to contact fences, etc., without offending them. (Covert)
• Shield: using a shield or buckler in combat, both on offense and defense. [Mediocre] (Combat)
• Shiphandling: directing seamen to correctly handle a large sailing ship. Includes piloting and navigation skills. [Terrible] (Professional)
• Shopkeeping: running a shop of some sort - knowledge of basic bookkeeping, sources of materials, rotation of stock, general prices, sales techniques, etc. (Professional)
• Sleight of Hand: manipulating small objects cleverly in your hands so as to conceal what you are actually doing with them. (Athletic)
• Sling: using a sling in combat. [Terrible] (Combat)
• Smithy: working metal into tools, weapons, ornaments, etc. [Terrible] (Professional)
• Spear: using a spear in combat, but not including throwing it accurately or powerfully. (Combat)
• Spear Throwing: throwing a spear powerfully and accurately. (Combat)
• Sports, Various: each sport is a separate skill - hurling, lacrosse, etc. (Athletic)
• Staff: using a staff as a weapon. (Combat)
• Storytelling: entertaining by recounting stories, either from your past or from other sources. Storytelling without the Performing skill is more likely to be successful in a bar or other personal setting than in a professional setting. (Social)
• Streetwise: Savoir-Faire for the lower classes. (Covert)
• Survival: surviving in the wilds. Includes basic fire making, food procurement, and shelter construction. Won't be fancy, but you'll be alive. (Scouting)
• Swimming: moving yourself in water without danger of drowning. (Athletic)
• Tactics: knowledge of the best way to arrange a group of warriors so as to take best advantage of the situation, terrain, their skills, etc. Also reading an opposing group's tactical sophistication level. (Combat)
• Tailing: following someone without their noticing. Opposed by Perception. (Covert)
• Tailor: turning cloth into clothes, as well as mending clothing. Can also make other items out of cloth, such as tents. (Professional)
• Teaching: imparting knowledge or skills to others. (Professional)
• Team Acrobatics: working with others trained in this skill to perform acrobatic maneuvers such as stacking, vaulting, trapeze work, etc. (Athletic)
• Teamster: handling an animal or team of animals pulling a wagon, carriage, coach, etc. (Professional)
• Thaumatology: the knowledge of magic spells, results, abilities, etc. Does not require any Magical Ability, nor is it required to perform magic. [No Default] (Knowledge, Magic)
• Theater: the skills and knowledge associated with the theater: acting, directing, management of props, sets, the house, the stage, etc. Not the same as pretending to be someone else offstage - see Lie/Pretense for that skill. (Professional)
• Theology/Myths/Rituals: knowledge of a specific religion's beliefs, dogma, and rituals. It may also be Comparative Theology, in which case the knowledge is broader - covers more than one religion - but shallower. (Knowledge)
• Throwing: throwing things accurately, but not specifically optimized to do damage. That is, it's not a combat skill, though it could be used as one, with -1 to damage-dealing ability. (Athletic)
• Tracking: following animals or sentient beings in terrain where they might leave traces. Of limited use in urban areas, it is more a nature skill. (Scouting)
• Trail Blazing: finding an optimum route through wilderness, and marking your trail, either obviously or subtly. (Scouting)
• Two-handed Axe: using any two-handed axe designed as a weapon. (Combat)
• Two-handed Sword: using any two-handed sword as a weapon. (Combat)
• Urban Survival: the skill of the urban poor: where to find free or cheap food, shelter and clothing; what parts of the city to avoid, who not to offend, etc. (Covert)
• Ventriloquism: "throwing your voice" so as to make it sound as if it comes from somewhere else. Also disguising your voice. (Covert)
• Veterinarian: diagnosing and treating animal injuries and diseases. (Knowledge)
• Weather Sense: predicting the weather for the near future. (Knowledge)
• Weaving: spinning yarn from wool or plants, then making cloth from yarn. (Professional)
• Whittling: carving wood into useful or aesthetic shapes. (Athletic)
• Woods Lore: knowledge of woodland animals, plants, cycles, etc. (Scouting)
• Zoology: knowledge of animal behavior, habits, diets, capabilities, etc. (Knowledge)

Next up: Gifts and Faults
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Re: Roleplaying Club Info

Post  azer on Wed Jul 28, 2010 8:41 pm

Gifts
Each character may have two Gifts from the following list, or other GM-approved Gift. In addition, for each Fault chosen beyond the first two, the character may have an additional Gift. The GM may limit the number of Gifts available from this method, as things can get a little out of hand ... You may also gain a Gift, with GM approval, by foregoing one of your free attribute levels.
Certain Gifts, marked with an asterisk (*) may be lost if abused. Contacts, Favors Due, and Patron depend on the goodwill of others, and it's possible to push them too far or too frequently. Good Reputation can be eroded by inappropriate behavior, and Rank can be lost if you break the rules of the organization granting the rank.
• Ambidexterity: you can use either hand equally well. Great for those times when you're wounded in an arm ...
• Attractive: you're good looking - either handsome, beautiful, pretty, or whatever level you wish. (Warning: the more attractive you are, the more power you have over susceptible people, true, but the more likely you are to be abducted, etc.)
• Beautiful speaking voice: +1 to NPC reactions. Also works for a singing voice if you take a Musical skill.
• Charisma: people tend to like you, believe you, and are willing to follow your lead.
• Common Sense: when you are about to do something incredibly stupid that will harm yourself or the party, the GM will warn you.
• Contacts *: you know some influential or knowledgeable people who can supply you with information.
• Danger Sense: the GM will make a Situational roll - on a Good or better result, you'll be warned of some imminent danger.
• Empathy with Animals: animals trust you and domesticated ones tend to obey you. Cruelty to animals nullifies this Gift.
• Empathy with Sentient Beings: see Innate Magical Ability: Second Sight.
• Familiar: only available to characters with Magical Power or Magical Talent. You have a magical familiar, which may talk, aid you in spell-casting and other tasks. This is an NPC played by the GM.
• Favors due *: some people owe you favors, which you may collect. Each favor you collect must be approved by the GM.
• Focused: you are at +1 to any lengthy task, but don't notice things outside this task, such as that brigand about to skewer you ...
• Good Memory: you have an unusually good memory. The player may take notes during the game and act as if the character remembered them.
• Good Reputation *: you're well known as a hero, healer, leader, fighter for justice, etc.
• High Status: you are of the gentry or religious class - or nobility if you take this Gift twice.
• Intuition: you have a feeling about what option to take when confronted with a choice. The GM will make a Situational roll in secret.
• Lucky: once per hour (real time), you may reroll a bad dice roll, and choose the better of the two rolls.
• Magic Resistance: you are resistant to direct magic: +3 to Willpower in any Opposed rolls versus magic.
• Never forgets a ____: fill in the blank with name, face, or whatever the GM will allow.
• Never Gets Lost: you always know which way is North, and can retrace your route with a little effort.
• Night Vision: you see well in dim light, but not in absolute darkness, of course.
• Pain Tolerance: ignore wound penalties at Hurt, and you are only at -1 at Very Hurt.
• Patron *: someone in power likes you. This can be simply a letter of recommendation, or it can be a favor granted.
• Perfect Timing: if someone says to open the gate in five minutes, you'll do it within two seconds of that time. Also valuable in performing.
• Peripheral Vision: you can see further to the sides than most people - less easily attacked from the side-rear.
• Quick Reflexes: not easily surprised by any physical attack, and you adjust quickly to shifting footing.
• Rank *: you have the right to command others in an organized body of soldiers or police.
• Rapid Healing: you heal twice as fast from wounds - but not magically fast.
• Resistant to Poison: poison has only half effect on you.
• Tough Hide: subtract 1 from each amount of damage you take.
• Veteran: you're experienced - add one level to each of three skills that are currently at Fair or Mediocre.
• Wealthy: you start with more money than the average starting character. This can be in cash and/or equipment.
Faults
Each character must start with two Faults from the following list, or other GM-approved Fault. In addition, each Fault chosen beyond the mandatory two allows the player to choose an additional Gift for his character, or raise an attribute one level, subject to GM approval.
• Absent-Minded: your attention tends to wander if bored.
• Annoying Voice: you sound terrible.
• Appearance: your appearance is off-putting in some way, whether ugly or unkempt.
• Bad Back: you are limited in what you can lift.
• Bad Eyesight: you don't see very well - pick one: poor distance or up-close vision.
• Blunt and Tactless: you have no social skills in dealing with sensitive people.
• Code of Honor: your actions are constrained by your personal behavior code.
• Color Blindness: you confuse lots of colors.
• Combat Paralysis: you need a Good or better Health roll in order to act in a dangerous situation.
• Compulsive Carousing: you are at -3 Willpower to resist a good time.
• Compulsive Gambling: your are at -3 Willpower to resist a gambling game.
• Compulsive Generosity: you are at -3 Willpower to resist giving things away to those perceived to be needier than you.
• Compulsive Lying: you are at -3 Willpower to avoid lying just for fun.
• Coward: you take very good care of yourself.
• Curious: you are at -3 Willpower to resist exploring something new or unusual.
• Delusions: the world doesn't work the way you think it does, in some important way.
• Dependent: you're responsible for someone unable to care for themselves adequately.
• Duty: you must perform active duty a certain amount of time.
• Dwarfism: you are very short for your race.
• Easily Distractible: did you say something?.
• Easy to Read: you give away your thoughts and feelings to any who care to observe you.
• Enemy: there is someone who wants to kill, imprison, or otherwise trouble you.
• Fanatic Patriot: your country, right or wrong.
• Frightens Animals: you have an aura that animals find terrifying.
• Garrulous: you won't shut up.
• Getting old: and all that implies.
• Glutton: you're hungry.
• Goes Berserk if Wounded: you're a danger to your friends, even.
• Greedy: you want more.
• Grouchy: you're usually irritated and try to spread the mood.
• Gullible: -3 to Reasoning to believe an unknown "fact."
• Hard of Hearing: what?
• Honesty: you hate to break a law. See Truthfulness for not liking to lie.
• Humanitarian: you help the needy for no pay.
• Idealist: you're not grounded in reality.
• Impulsive: you act before thinking.
• Intolerant: you hate a certain type of person.
• Jealous of Anyone Getting More Attention: you have to be the star.
• Lame: you limp, which can affect speed and agility.
• Lazy: you work hard at avoiding work.
• Lechery: you're overly fond of the appropriate sex.
• Loyal to Companions: you won't abandon, cheat, hide treasure from, etc., the party members. This one may be mandatory.
• Magic Susceptibility: you are at -3 Willpower to oppose hostile magic.
• Melancholy: life is so sad.
• Miserliness: you hate to let it go.
• Mute: you can't speak.
• Night Blindness: you see poorly in dim light.
• Nosy: your neighbor's business is yours.
• Obese: you waddle.
• Obsession: you must do it, or have it, or whatever.
• Offensive Habits: too many to list. Some of the other Faults listed actually fall under this category, such as Nosy, Grouchy, Garrulous, etc.
• Offensive Odor: you stink.
• One Eye: you lack depth vision and can be blindsided, literally.
• One Hand: it works overtime.
• Outlaw: you're wanted by the law.
• Overconfident: you know you can't fail.
• Owe favors: you owe someone favors, and they'll ask you for them sometime.
• Pain Intolerant: you're at -1 if Scratched, -2 if Hurt, and -3 if Very Hurt.
• Phobias: lots of these - you're at -3 Willpower to avoid acting out of control in certain situations: snakes, darkness, heights, cats, falling, crowds, spiders, open or closed spaces, magic, loud noises, etc.
• Poor: you start with less equipment and cash, and if you don't buy off this Fault, will always lose any you gain.
• Practical Joker: you can't resist. Somebody's gonna hurt you someday.
• Primitive: you're from a pre-metal-working society.
• Proud: many things are beneath your dignity.
• Quick to take offense: you're thin-skinned.
• Quick-Tempered: you blow up when crossed.
• Quixotic: you vigorously champion lost causes.
• Reckless Bravery: you take no thought for your safety in dangerous situations.
• Reputation: you're well known as some sort of louse.
• Secret: if it's revealed, you'll be embarrassed, arrested, or worse - maybe that warrant out for your arrest, or your second spouse?
• Self-defense Pacifist: you'll fight, but you'll never start a fight - no preemptive strikes.
• Shyness: you never want to talk to strangers.
• Social Stigma: you're obviously from some low-caste group.
• Stubborn: you don't easily admit you're wrong. Has nothing to do with Willpower.
• Susceptibility to Poison: you're at -3 to Health in Opposed rolls for poison.
• Trickster: you regularly have to take a risk to thwart some villain, even if just a petty one.
• Truthfulness: you can't tell a believable lie.
• Unlucky: if something bad happens to someone in the party, it's you.
• Vain: you're the best-looking and/or finest person in the world. Aren't your companions lucky?
• Vow: you're committed to some action.
• Worry Wart: you wring your hands a lot.
• Xenophobia: you dislike and fear people different from the folks you grew up with.
• Youth: you're so young no one takes you seriously. Also, lose one level each from three skills - you just haven't had time to develop everything that well yet.

Next: Magic, Backstory, and Development


Last edited by azer on Wed Jul 28, 2010 8:43 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Re: Roleplaying Club Info

Post  azer on Wed Jul 28, 2010 8:42 pm

Magic and Priesthood

In exchange for one gift and one flaw, a character may, subject to GM approval take on the role of Fool’s Guild Member or Priest, but NOT both. These associations both grant access to certain special powers, but also carry certain limitations. If a character is found to be practicing magic or to be a member of the Fool’s Guild, he/she is liable to be sentenced to death. A Priest may not kill another sentient being, and if he/she ever deviates from the instructions of his/her deity, he/she is stripped of all priestly powers (see the section on Deities and Magic for more information).

Backstory

Your character should be more than just a list of skills, gifts, and flaws; he/she should have a story. What was his/her childhood like? What is the character’s personality, what are his mannerisms, tastes, and goals? These should be things you are aware of, so that you can better roleplay your character.

Character Development

During play, the GM can award experience points (EP), which the player can trade in any way he wants at the following rates:
Raising a skill from: To: Costs:
Terrible Poor 1 EP
Poor Mediocre 1 EP
Mediocre Fair 1 EP
Fair Good 2 EP
Good Great 4 EP
Great Superb 8 EP
Superb Legendary 16 EP + GM permission
Legendary Legendary 2nd 30 EP + GM permission
Each additional level of Legendary: 50 EP + GM permission
• Raising an attribute:
Triple the cost for skills of the same level.
• Adding a gift:
6 EP (or more) + GM approval.
• Adding a supernormal power:
12 EP (or more) + GM approval.
A trait can only be raised one level at a time.
The GM may adjust these point levels as she sees fit and should require that the player may only raise traits that were used significantly during an adventure. If a long campaign is planned, these EP costs could be doubled to allow room for character growth. Defining skills narrowly will also ensure characters don't become too powerful too quickly.
As a guideline, good roleplaying should be rewarded with one to three EP per gaming session, with an upper suggested limit of four EP for flawless roleplaying. Players may save EP as long as they wish.
Attribute levels may or may not affect EPs put into skills. For simplicity, you can ignore attribute levels entirely when raising skill levels. For greater realism, however, the GM can add a surcharge of +2 EP (or more) when a skill is raised above an appropriate attribute.
Example: Violet the Herbalist has Good Intelligence. EP costs for raising Herb Lore skill are normal until she tries to raise it to Great, which is higher than her natural Intelligence. At that point, she must pay +2 EP beyond what the table calls for: six EP to raise Herb Lore to Great, and another ten EP to raise it to Superb.

Next up: Combat
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Re: Roleplaying Club Info

Post  azer on Wed Jul 28, 2010 8:44 pm

Combat

Each combat round consists of two actions: the fighter with the higher initiative attacks while the other defends, then the second combatant attacks while the first defends. With multiple characters involved in combat, the side with the initiative makes all their attacks, then the other side makes all their attacks. Or the GM may run the combat in initiative order, even if fighters from both sides are interspersed throughout the combat turn.
Gaining initiative is an Opposed action, using the Agility ability. A gift such as Combat Reflexes can grant a +1 to initiative. Surprise may grant a bonus to the roll, or give automatic initiative. Initiative can be rolled once for each battle or once each round. Perhaps a character could trade skill for initiative: attack hastily (+1 to initiative that round) but be slightly off balance because of it (-1 to attack and defend that round).
Each attack is an Opposed Action: the attacker's Offensive skill (Sword, Melee Weapon, Martial Art, etc.) against a defender's Defensive skill (Parry) or the defender’s Agility stat (one or the other).
Some weapons, such as an Axe, are poor parrying weapons. Players should ask the GM at character creation if a weapon may be used to parry and still be used to attack without penalty in the next turn - and give their characters decent Shield or Dodge skills to compensate for poor parrying weapons.
All-out offensive and defensive tactics can be used. A character forfeits his attack for a round if he chooses All-out defense, and is at -2 on his defense on his opponent's next turn if choosing All-out offense - or perhaps gets no defense at all!
The default defense for animals depends on their type: carnivores will usually have a Defense value one level less than their Offense, while this is reversed for most prey species.
Some situations call for one side or the other's trait level to be modified. Here are some examples:
A fighter who is Hurt is at -1, while one who is Very Hurt is at -2.
• If one fighter has a positional advantage over the other, there may be a penalty (-1 or -2) to the fighter in the worse position. Examples include bad footing, lower elevation, light in his eyes, kneeling, etc.
• Subtract the value of a shield from the opponent's weapon skill. A small shield has a value of +1 in melee combat only, while a medium shield has a value of +1 in melee combat and +1 to defense against ranged attacks (if the shield material is impervious to the weapon). A large shield (+2 in all combat) is cumbersome to lug around. The larger the shield carried, the more the GM should assess penalties for things such as acrobatic and other fancy maneuvers. Shields can also be used offensively to push an opponent back, for example, or knock someone over.
• Compare combatants' weapon sizes and shields (see Section 4.54, Sample Wound Factors List). If one fighter's weapon + shield value is +2 (or more) greater than the other fighter's weapon + shield value, the fighter with the smaller weapon is at -1 to his combat skill. (Example: one fighter has a Two-handed sword: +4 to damage. His opponent has a knife and an average shield: +1 to damage, +1 for shield makes a total of +2. The knife wielder is at -1 to skill in this combat since his weapon modifier is -2 less than the sword fighter's.)
• Aiming at a specific small body part (such as an eye or hand) will require a minimum result of Good or Great to hit and also have a -1 to the trait level. If a result of Great is needed and the fighter only gets a Good result but still wins the Opposed action, he hits the other fighter - but not in the part aimed for.
• A fighter may have a magical blessing (+1 or more) or curse (-1 or worse).
• All-out offense, such as a berserk attack, grants a +1 to the combat skill (and an additional +1 for damage, if successful). However, if an all-out attacker ties or loses the Opposed action, the other fighter wins, and gets +2 to damage!
• An All-out defensive stance earns a +2 to the combat skill, but such a combatant cannot harm his foe except with a critical result.
• A successful All-out Defense and a successful Perception or Tactics roll produces a -1 penalty to the opponent on the next round. The fighter takes a few seconds to scope out the area and maneuvers to take advantage of any terrain or conditional irregularity. Similar combat subtleties are possible, and encouraged - taking a successful All-out defense one round can allow a player to try an acrobatics maneuver the next combat round without risk of being hit, for example.
When more than one opponent attacks a single fighter, they have, at least, a positional advantage. To reflect this, the lone fighter is at -1 to his skill for each additional foe beyond the first. (For epic-style games, with a few heroes battling hordes of enemies, this penalty can be reduced, or the GM can simply give the hordes Poor skills and low Damage Capacity - which is not out of character for a horde.)
The lone fighter rolls once, and the result is compared with each of the opponents' rolled degrees, one after the other. The solo combatant has to defeat or tie all of the opponents in order to inflict a wound on one of them. If he beats all of his foes, he may hit the foe of his choice. If he ties his best opponent, he can only wound another whose result is at least two levels below his.
Example: Paco is facing three thugs, who have just rolled a Great, Good, and Mediocre result, respectively. Paco rolls a Great result, tying the best thug. He hits the thug who scored a Mediocre result (at least two levels below his result) and is not hit himself (he tied the best thug).
The lone fighter takes multiple wounds in a single round if two or more enemies hit him. Usually, he can inflict damage on only one foe in any given round - his choice of those he bested. It's also possible to allow a sweeping blow to damage more than one foe at a time. Of course, this slows a slash down: reduce damage done by 1 or 2 for each foe cut through.
A well-armored fighter facing weak opponents can simply concentrate on one foe and let the others try to get through his armor (that is, not defend himself at all against some of his attackers). In this case, the lone fighter can damage his chosen foe even if he is hit by other, ignored foes. This is historically accurate for knights wading through peasant levies, for example. There may or may not be a penalty for the lone fighter in this case.
There's a limit to the number of foes that can simultaneously attack a single opponent. Six is about the maximum under ideal conditions (such as wolves, or spear-wielders), while only three or four can attack if using weapons or martial arts that require a lot of maneuvering space. If the lone fighter is in a doorway, only one or two fighters can reach him.
A light blow to an eye is very different from a light blow to an armored shoulder, or to a shield. Using a hit location system adds flavor to combat and the description of a character's equipment, wounds - and scars! Many games have a hit location system, and a GM can easily translate one she is familiar with to FUDGE. Or she can use the simple system given here.
The simplest system is not to worry about "called shots." Merely say the better the relative degree, the better the location of the blow. Winning a battle by +8 will allow the attacker to pierce an eye, if desired. Hopefully, the players will describe their actions in such detail that the GM will know how close they came to their objective merely by looking at the relative degree.
A more complicated system: an attacker can announce that he is aiming at a specific body location - this must be done before rolling to hit. The GM decides the minimum relative degree necessary for such a shot to succeed, usually ranging from 2 to 4, though extreme locations (such as an eyeball) are harder to hit. So if a player wishes his character to hit his opponent's weapon arm, the GM can respond, "You have to win by two to do so." If the player then does win by relative degree two or more, the weapon arm is hit, and the wound is specific to that arm.
If the attacker wins the combat round, but not by the minimum relative degree needed to hit the called target, the defender names which part of the body - or shield! - is hit. This will most likely be general body (if there is no shield), but it could be the off-hand,
which would carry a lesser combat penalty than a wound to the torso. The GM may have to fudge some here.
A damaged specific body part can be described as being Scratched (no real game effect), Hurt (a penalty to use, but the body part still functions), and Incapacitated. After battle is the time to decide if an Incapacitated body part can be healed, or is permanently Incapacitated.
A Hurt body part is generally at -1 to its normal use. A Hurt sword arm gives a -1 penalty to combat, for example, while a Hurt leg is -1 to any running, acrobatics, etc. A Hurt eye is -1 to vision, and so on.
To determine the exact level of the damage, the GM should consider how well the hit scored, as well as the Strength of the attacker and the weapon being used. Winning by the minimum relative degree necessary to hit the specific body part shouldn't make the victim Incapacitated unless the attacker is of a much larger Scale than the defender. On the other hand, an arm hit with a battle axe wielded by a large, berserk Viking has a good chance of being cut off even if the Viking just rolled exactly what he needed to hit the arm . . .
As a guideline, if the attacker surpasses the relative degree necessary to hit the body part at all, the part is Scratched or Hurt, depending on Strength and weapon deadliness. If he surpasses it significantly, the part is Hurt or Incapacitated.
Combat damage to a character can be described as being at one of seven stages of severity. The stages are:
Undamaged:
no wounds at all. The character is not necessarily healthy - he may be sick, for example. But he doesn't have a combat wound that's recent enough to be bothering him.
Just A Scratch:
no real game effect, except to create tension. This may eventually lead to being Hurt if the character is hit again. This term comes from the famous movie line, "I'm okay, it's only a scratch." The actual wound itself may be a graze, bruise, cut, abrasion, etc., and the GM whose game is more serious in tone may choose to use one of these terms instead.
Hurt:
the character is wounded significantly, enough to slow him down: -1 to all traits which would logically be affected. A Hurt result in combat can also be called a Light Wound.
Very Hurt:
the character is seriously hurt, possibly stumbling: -2 to all traits which would logically be affected. A Very Hurt result can also be called a Severe Wound.
Incapacitated:
the character is so badly wounded as to be incapable of any actions, except possibly dragging himself a few feet every now and then or gasping out an important message. A lenient GM can allow an Incapacitated character to perform such elaborate actions as opening a door or grabbing a gem . . .
Near Death:
the character is not only unconscious, he'll die in less than an hour - maybe a lot less - without medical help. No one recovers from Near Death on their own unless very lucky.
Dead:
he has no more use for his possessions, unless he belongs to a culture that believes he'll need them in the afterlife . . .
When determining how wounded a character is when hit in combat, take into consideration all of the following factors:
1. The relative degree the attack succeeded by - the better the hit, the greater likelihood of damage. Winning a combat round with a relative degree of +1 means you probably hit where the opponent is most heavily armored. Scoring a hit with a +3 finds a chink in the armor.
2. The strength of the blow. For muscle-powered weapons, such as melee weapons, unarmed attacks, bows, slings, etc., this is determined by the attacker's Strength attribute: stronger folks tend to hit harder. The relative Scale modifier is also figured in here. For things like guns, beam weapons, etc., it is relative to the nature of the weapon: a .38 usually does more damage than a .22. The technological level of the weapon can be important.
3. The deadliness of the attacker's weapon. Big weapons tend to do more damage than little weapons; sharp weapons rip tissue more than dull ones, but blunt weapons can cause concussive damage through armor thick enough to stop a sharp weapon. People trained in Karate tend to do more damage than those untrained in any martial art.
4. The defender's armor. People wearing thicker armor, and more of it, tend to get hurt less than those wearing no armor. Armor can be finely differentiated, or simply said to be Light, Medium, or Heavy armor. Science fiction scenarios will have Extra-Heavy armor, and even further levels. Fantasy campaigns may include magic armor that offers even greater protection, sometimes specific against certain types of damage.
5. The amount of damage the victim can soak up (Robustness, Damage Capacity, or Mass). Big, healthy guys can take more damage before collapsing than little, sickly guys. But it's your call if it's a big, sickly fighter against a little, healthy fellow.
4.54 Sample Wound Factors List
For those who prefer numerical values, here are some suggested numbers to attach to the factors listed in the previous section. These may be customized to taste, of course, and are only offered as a starting point. If used, they should be written down on the character sheet at character creation (probably with the weapons and armor), so as to be readily available during combat.
Offensive factors:
For Character's Strength (muscle-powered weapons only):
+3 for Superb Strength
+2 for Great Strength
+1 for Good Strength
+0 for Fair Strength
-1 for Mediocre Strength
-2 for Poor Strength
-3 for Terrible Strength
For Attacker's Scale:
Add the attacker's Strength Scale (see Section 4.58, Non-human Scale in Combat).
Note: the attacker's Strength Scale is relevant only for muscle-powered weapons and for those projectile weapons scaled to the attacker's size, such as miniature bazookas or giant-sized handguns. A superhero of Scale 10 using an ordinary pistol would not figure his Scale into the Offensive Damage Modifier.
For Weapon's Strength (Guns, Crossbows, Beam weapons, etc.,):
+/- Strength of weapon (see Section 4.4, Ranged Combat).
For Muscle-Powered Weapon:
-1 for no weapon, not using a Martial Art skill.
+0 Martial Art skill, or for small weapons (blackjack, knife, brass knuckles, sling, thick boots if kicking, etc.).
+1 for medium-weight one-handed weapons (billy club, machete, shortsword, epee, hatchet, rock, etc.).
+2 for large one-handed weapons (broadsword, axe, large club, etc.), or for light two-handed weapons (spear, bow, etc.).
+3 for most two-handed weapons (polearm, two-handed sword, battleaxe, etc.).
+1 for sharpness (add to other weapon damage: knife becomes +1, shortsword +2, broadsword +3, greatsword +4, etc.).
Note: For a less lethal game, subtract 1 from each type of weapon except sharpness. (This will lengthen combats.)
Note: the value of a shield may be subtracted from the opponent's skill - see Section 4.31, Melee Modifiers.
Optional note, as an example of the detail you can achieve in FUDGE: for heavy blunt metal weapons, such as maces and flails, halve any protection from the defender's armor, round down. The concussive damage from such weapons is slowed, but not totally stopped, by most armor. Example: if using a large mace (+2 weapon) against plate armor (+4 armor), the armor only counts as +2 armor.
Defensive factors:
For Character's Damage Capacity Attribute:
Note: this is optional - see Section 4.52, Damage Capacity, for a complete discussion.
+3 for Superb Damage Capacity
+2 for Great Damage Capacity
+1 for Good Damage Capacity
+0 for Fair Damage Capacity
-1 for Mediocre Damage Capacity
-2 for Poor Damage Capacity
-3 for Terrible Damage Capacity
For Armor:
+1 for light, pliable non-metal armor.
+2 for heavy, rigid non-metal armor
+2 for light metal armor.
+3 for medium metal armor.
+4 for heavy metal armor.
+5 or more for science fiction advanced armor.
Note: magical armor may add anywhere from +1 to whatever the GM will allow to any given armor type above.
For Defender's Mass Scale:
Plus the defender's Mass Scale (see Section 4.58, Non-human Scale in Combat).
(If the defender has Mass other than Fair, or a gift of Tough Hide, it should also be figured in.)
4.55 Determining Wound Level
A given blow will cause a certain level of wounding. In the simplest wound determination system, the GM assesses all of the Wound Factors (Section 4.53) and announces how bad the wound is. (In some cases, however, the PCs won't know the precise degree of damage. In those cases, the GM can simply say, "You think you wounded her, but she's still on her feet," or, "You don't notice any effect.")
As an example, the GM thinks to herself, "Okay, the fighter with Good Strength just scored a Great hit with a broadsword. The loser rolled a Fair combat roll, has Good Damage Capacity and heavy leather armor. Hmm - I'll say the Strength and Damage Capacity cancel each other, while the sharp sword should be able to penetrate the leather armor if the blow is good enough. A Great hit against a Fair defense is enough, but not really massive: I'd say the loser is Hurt." This result would then be announced to the loser of the combat round.
The GM can also use a Situational roll to help her. Roll the dice behind a GM screen, and let the result guide you. A roll of -1 to +1 isn't significant - no change from what you decided. But a roll of +3 or +4 adds a wound level or two to the damage.
See Section 4.57, Recording Wounds, for details on how to keep track of wounds received.
That system, while simple and satisfying to a certain type of GM, doesn't do much for those who prefer the system detailed in Section 4.54, Sample Wound Factors List. There's no point in figuring out the offensive and defensive factors if you don't do something with the numbers.
One system that uses the offensive and defensive factors requires finding the total damage factor. This is derived by adding up all the attacker's offensive factors and then subtracting all the defender's factors.
Example, Leroy vs. Theodora:
Leroy:
Good Strength (+1)
Scale 0
Broadsword (+2 for size, +1 for sharpness = +3 weapon).
o Offensive damage factors = 1+0+3 = 4

Good Damage Capacity (+1)
Scale mail armor (+3)
o Defensive damage factors = 1+0+3 = 4.
Theodora:
Superb Strength (+3)
Scale 0
Poleaxe (+4)
o Offensive damage factors = 3+0+4 = 7

Fair Damage Capacity (+0)
Boiled leather armor (+2)
o Defensive damage factors = 0+0+2 = 2.
Leroy's total damage factor against Theodora is 4-2 = 2.
Theodora's total damage factor against Leroy is 7-4 = 3.
Since Theodora's damage factor is larger, if she hits him, she'll do more damage to him than he would to her for an equally well-placed blow.
Once these numbers are determined, jot them down so you don't have to refigure them each combat round.
This system requires each character sheet to have a wound record track which looks like:
1,2 3,4 5,6 7,8 9+
Wounds: Scratch Hurt Very Hurt Incapacitated Near Death
The numbers above the wound levels represent the amount of damage needed in a single blow to inflict the wound listed under the number. For example, a blow of three or four points Hurts the character, while a blow of five or six points inflicts a Very Hurt wound.
These numbers can be customized by the GM to fit her conception of how damage affects people. Raising the numbers makes it harder to wound someone, while lowering them makes combat more deadly.
Note that there is no number given for Dead. This is left up to the GM, and deliberately not included to prevent accidental PC death.
However, you can't simply use the damage factor you determined above - relative degree is also important.
A relative degree of +1 is treated as a graze - see Section 4.56, Grazing.
Otherwise, simply add the relative degree to the damage factor. (You may also wish to include a damage roll - see Section 4.61, Damage Die Roll.)
The result is a number that may or may not be a positive number. If it's 0 or less, no damage is scored.
If the number is positive, look up the result across the top of the wound levels, and figure the wound as described above. If Leroy hits Theodora with a relative degree of +2, he adds that to his damage potential of +2 to produce a damage number of four. Looking down, we see that a result of four is a Hurt result (Light Wound). Theodora is Hurt, and at -1 until she is healed.
For more detail, see Section 4.7, Combat and Wounding Example.
There are other ways to figure damage. A GM who believes the relative degree is more important than the damage factor would double it before adding it to the damage factor. The numbers above the wound levels should be adjusted in this case:
1-3 4-6 7-9 10-12 13+
Wounds: Scratch Hurt Very Hurt Incapacitated Near Death
This is a satisfying system that is recommended for those who don't mind doubling relative degree.
Others feel Strength is more important, and so on. A totally different wounding system is given in Section 4.63, Min-Mid-Max Die Roll. Many others have been proposed for FUDGE over the years, and it would be easy to import one from another game system. Use what you feel comfortable with.
4.56 Grazing
Any relative degree of +1 can do at most a GM-set Wound level (plus any Scale difference). It may do no damage at all, depending on the opponent's defensive factors: a fist hitting plate mail won't hurt the armored knight in the slightest - unless it's a giant's fist.
Sample graze severity table:
Damage
Factor Result
<0 Undamaged
0-4 Scratch
5+ Hurt
A GM may or may not allow a damage die roll on a graze, even if using the die rolls for other hits. If allowed, a damage roll shouldn't change the result of a graze by more than one level.
Scale difference is a little trickier to figure, but it should be minimized for such a narrow victory: a giant's club could give a human a glancing blow that might inflict a Very Hurt result, but not necessarily Incapacitate.
On the other hand, a tiger biting a mouse with a relative degree of +1 grazes the mouse as a cow grazes grass . . .
4.57 Recording Wounds
Once the final damage is determined, it is recorded on the wounded fighter's character sheet. Each individual wound is described as a Scratch, Hurt (Light Wound), etc., as introduced in Section 4.51, Wound Levels.
Use a Damage Capacity attribute as an easy way to record wounds. (In this case, Damage Capacity is not figured into determining wound severity.) Each hit that is greater than a Scratch reduces a character's Damage Capacity attribute one level - or more, if the GM deems the hit to be severe enough. (Scratches can accumulate as the GM desires - perhaps three Scratches equal one hit.)
When someone is reduced to Mediocre Damage Capacity, he is Hurt: -1 to all actions. When he is at Poor Damage Capacity, he is Very Hurt: -2 to all actions. When he drops to Terrible, he is at -3 to all actions - or Incapacitated, if a GM wishes to play it that way. Damage Capacity below Terrible is Incapacitated, at least - possibly worse.
(For characters of Mediocre or worse Damage Capacity, these levels only affect them when damaged. That is, an undamaged character of Mediocre Damage Capacity is not at -1 to all actions. However, if he takes even one hit, he drops to Poor Damage Capacity, and is at -2 to all actions.)
Healing in such a system cannot raise Damage Capacity above a character's undamaged level - that can only be raised through Character Development (Chapter 5).
A more detailed method requires a space on the character sheet to record wounds. This would look like:
1,2 3,4 5,6 7,8 9+
Wounds: Scratch Hurt Very Hurt Incapac. Near Death
O O O O O O O
The numbers above the wound levels are discussed in Section 4.55, Determining Wound Level.
The boxes below the wound levels represent how many of each wound type a fighter can take.
When a wound is received, mark off the appropriate box.
Example: A character takes a Very Hurt result in the first round of combat. The character sheet would then look like:
1,2 3,4 5,6 7,8 9+
Wounds: Scratch Hurt Very Hurt Incapac. Near Death
O O O O X O O
This character is at -2 to all skills since he's Very Hurt.
If he then received a Hurt result, he would check it off like so:
1,2 3,4 5,6 7,8 9+
Wounds: Scratch Hurt Very Hurt Incapac. Near Death
O O O X X O O
This character is still at -2 to all skills. The Hurt result is not cumulative with the Very Hurt result; only the penalty for the highest recorded wound level counts.
If there is no open box for a given wound result, the character takes the next highest wound for which there is an open box.
If the character above, for example, takes another Hurt result, we see that there is no open box in either Hurt or Very Hurt, so we have to go to Incapacitated: the character is now incapacitated, and the sheet would look like:
1,2 3,4 5,6 7,8 9+
Wounds: Scratch Hurt Very Hurt Incapac. Near Death
O O O X X H O
Note that an "H" is recorded under the Incapacitated label. The character is indeed Incapacitated - he can't fight any more - but for healing (and scarring) purposes, he has only received two Hurt wounds and one Very Hurt wound - never an Incapacitating wound in one blow. Since Incapacitating blows are harder to heal from, this is important.
As another example, a character that takes two Very Hurt results without taking any other hits is Incapacitated, since that is the next highest wound level.
Note that three boxes are provided under Scratch. This can be customized by each GM, of course. A Scratch wound will not make a fighter Hurt until he receives his fourth Scratch. Optionally, a Scratch will never raise a character's wound level beyond Very Hurt, no matter how many he takes. The GM should not to use this rule when the PCs fight a monster of huge Scale. Otherwise, they'd never be able to kill such a creature when the worst wound they can inflict is a Scratch.
The wound progression above makes for a fairly realistic campaign. For a more cinematic campaign (especially those without magic or science fiction healing), add an extra box for Scratch, Hurt, and possibly Very Hurt: lesser blows won't accumulate so quickly to hinder the character. A moderately cinematic character sheet looks like:
1,2 3,4 5,6 7,8 9+
Wounds: Scratch Hurt Very Hurt Incapac. Near Death
O O O O O O O O O
It wouldn't be out of line, for an epic scale game, to add up to two more boxes to Hurt and Very Hurt.
Be warned that adding boxes can lengthen combat significantly.
Never add boxes for cannon-fodder NPCs, though you may wish to do so for major NPCs. In fact, NPC pawns don't even need the system above. A simple three-stage system of Undamaged, Hurt, Out of the Battle is good enough for most of them. Simply make a mark under an NPC's name for Hurt, and cross out the name for Out of the Battle.
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Re: Roleplaying Club Info

Post  azer on Mon Aug 02, 2010 10:55 am

Bump
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Re: Roleplaying Club Info

Post  IzNotSpontaneous on Mon Aug 02, 2010 11:59 am

wow, that's a lot of text Puzzled I read the first 2 or 3 posts. Sounds cool, but you need to paraphrase. sounds very similar to DnD
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Re: Roleplaying Club Info

Post  azer on Mon Aug 02, 2010 12:14 pm

Similar to D&D??!?
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Re: Roleplaying Club Info

Post  IzNotSpontaneous on Mon Aug 02, 2010 12:44 pm

well the roleplaying... idk, I got tired of reading after the third post
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Re: Roleplaying Club Info

Post  Matt Bacon on Fri Aug 13, 2010 4:08 am

its good, try giantitp for PEACH
lots of roleplaying is good, there should be duct tape.
I am world building right now, (actully i have one lawful evil city) and i can post its contents here.
I only have one lawful evil city because thats the only place the characters can go right now, asides from their underground home, no they are not dwarves. YAY DWARVES!

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Re: Roleplaying Club Info

Post  Jon on Fri Aug 13, 2010 7:47 am

I'm tempted to tl;dr here but I read through the story and it sounds ok. As usual, I haven't read the rules yet. Razz

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Re: Roleplaying Club Info

Post  CookieMonsterofthe42 on Sat Aug 14, 2010 1:53 pm

Matt Bacon wrote:its good, try giantitp for PEACH
lots of roleplaying is good, there should be duct tape.
I am world building right now, (actully i have one lawful evil city) and i can post its contents here.
I only have one lawful evil city because thats the only place the characters can go right now, asides from their underground home, no they are not dwarves. YAY DWARVES!
aww they should be dwarves! Are there dragons then?
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Re: Roleplaying Club Info

Post  Matt Bacon on Sat Aug 14, 2010 2:26 pm

not really theres is an evil demilich though.

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Re: Roleplaying Club Info

Post  CookieMonsterofthe42 on Sat Aug 14, 2010 10:11 pm

Matt Bacon wrote:not really theres is an evil demilich though.
okay then I approve Happy
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Re: Roleplaying Club Info

Post  Jon on Fri Nov 26, 2010 3:34 pm

Okey, created a character:


Basic Info
Name: Dom Taiko
Sex: Male
Age: 35
Occupation: Zeppelin Pilot
Looks: Magnum
Alignment: Lawful Evil

Traits
Race: Najun
Reasoning: Great (+1)
Perception: Great
Willpower: Fair
Strength: Poor
Agility: Superb (+1)
Health: Mediocre

Magic (2)
Alchemy (Great)
Casting Skill (Good)
Literacy (Fair)+1(Good)

Covert (2)
Barroom Savvy (Great)
Lip-reading (Good)
Detect Lies (Fair)+1(Good)

Professional (1)
Engineer (Good)
Animal Training (Mediocre)+1(Fair)

Gifts/Faults
Gifts
Ambidexterity
Attractive
+1 Charisma
+1 Veteran

Faults
Compulsive Lying
Practical Joker
+1 Trickster
+1 Proud
+1 (trait) Vain
+1 (trait) Enemies

Other
Inventory
Sapient Pearwood Wand
50 mm rifle
Ammunition
Gunpowder
Wakizashi
Ivory Switchblade

Membership
Gentleman’s League
Harton Air Force

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Re: Roleplaying Club Info

Post  azer on Fri Nov 26, 2010 5:44 pm

Jon wrote:Okey, created a character:


Basic Info
Name: Dom Taiko
Sex: Male
Age: 35
Occupation: Zeppelin Pilot
Looks: Magnum
Alignment: Lawful Evil

Traits
Race: Najun
Reasoning: Great (+1)
Perception: Great
Willpower: Fair
Strength: Poor
Agility: Superb (+1)
Health: Mediocre

Magic (2)
Alchemy (Great)
Casting Skill (Good)
Literacy (Fair)+1(Good)

Covert (2)
Barroom Savvy (Great)
Lip-reading (Good)
Detect Lies (Fair)+1(Good)

Professional (1)
Engineer (Good)
Animal Training (Mediocre)+1(Fair)

Gifts/Faults
Gifts
Ambidexterity
Attractive
+1 Charisma
+1 Veteran

Faults
Compulsive Lying
Practical Joker
+1 Trickster
+1 Proud
+1 (trait) Vain
+1 (trait) Enemies

Other
Inventory
Sapient Pearwood Wand
50 mm rifle
Ammunition
Gunpowder
Wakizashi
Ivory Switchblade

Membership
Gentleman’s League
Harton Air Force

Cool character! Unfortunately, these rules are no longer applicable. I just sent out a new document with the correct rules (Marina should have gotten it) and the story hook. Plox to create a character with those rules.
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Re: Roleplaying Club Info

Post  Jon on Fri Nov 26, 2010 6:51 pm

A few questions: is it still in Sundon? are there still different races? is there still magic and renaissance-age tech?

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Re: Roleplaying Club Info

Post  azer on Fri Nov 26, 2010 6:56 pm

Jon wrote:A few questions: is it still in Sundon? are there still different races? is there still magic and renaissance-age tech?
It is still Sundon, but as I have noted you come from a fairly backwards part of the world (early medieval level tech), and you you do not really fit into any of the established racial categories. Please to note, all in the game, you should have night vision listed as an ability.
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Re: Roleplaying Club Info

Post  Jon on Fri Nov 26, 2010 7:03 pm

azer wrote:
Jon wrote:A few questions: is it still in Sundon? are there still different races? is there still magic and renaissance-age tech?
It is still Sundon, but as I have noted you come from a fairly backwards part of the world (early medieval level tech), and you you do not really fit into any of the established racial categories. Please to note, all in the game, you should have night vision listed as an ability.
Ok thanks. I sent you an email also, disregard that...

Here is my update charactersheet. I created an...uhmm... backstory.


Basic
Name: Dom Taiko
Sex: Male
Age: 18

Attributes
Knowledge: Great (From health, strength)
Perception: Great (From +1, -gift)
Willpower: Fair
Strength: Poor
Agility: Superb (From +1, strength, fault)
Health: Mediocre

Gifts and Faults
Gifts:
Charisma
Attractive
Lucky (+1 from fault)
(-1)
Night Vision (default)

Faults:
Compulsive Lying
Compulsive Carousing
Practical Joker
Proud
Vain

Skills
Covert (2)
Detect Lies: Great
Move Quietly: Good
Read Lips: Mediocre

Combat (1)
Knife: Good
Dodge: Mediocre

Blacksmith (2) (Gunsmith)

Other
Backstory: heh, heh. The son of the town’s Daimyo, my character was the first person in the town to go to a school and learn to read. He was sent to a school in Harton owned by the Gentleman’s League, which specialized in covert combat. It was here that he learned the martial arts. At age 17, he went back to the tiny town to take over the estate, but he soon became bored and idle with country life. Craving for adventure, he has decided to accompany his friends in to an unexplored area.


Last edited by Jon on Fri Nov 26, 2010 7:11 pm; edited 2 times in total

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Re: Roleplaying Club Info

Post  azer on Fri Nov 26, 2010 7:08 pm

Ahem. You did not seem to read the actual backstory I wrote. You have lived all of your life in a desert village isolated from the rest of the world. You have not the foggiest idea what the %^*( a gun is. You have a sharp, well-forged piece of metal that is perfectly functional as a knife. Imagine that you live with technology slightly lower than midevial England. Other than that your character sheet is fine.
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Re: Roleplaying Club Info

Post  Jon on Fri Nov 26, 2010 7:11 pm

azer wrote:Ahem. You did not seem to read the actual backstory I wrote. You have lived all of your life in a desert village isolated from the rest of the world. You have not the foggiest idea what the %^*( a gun is. You have a sharp, well-forged piece of metal that is perfectly functional as a knife. Imagine that you live with technology slightly lower than midevial England. Other than that your character sheet is fine.
Edited guns and switchblades out of my character sheet. And yes, I read the backstory...

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what is this I dont even dragon
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Re: Roleplaying Club Info

Post  BobShmob on Fri Nov 26, 2010 7:40 pm

Basic
Name: Viveka Jägerhon
Gender: Female
Age: 16
Profession: Healer

Attributes
Reasoning: Great
Perception: Great
Willpower: Fair
Strength: Mediocre
Agility: Great
Health: Mediocre

Skills
Climbing: Fair
Bow: Mediocre
Detect Lies: Fair
Knife Throwing: Good
Lip Reading: Fair
Move Quietly: Good
Pick Locks: Good
Pick Pockets: Fair

Gifts/Faults
Gifts:
Charisma
Lucky
Night Vision (Default)
Rapid Healing

Faults:
Compulsive Carousing
Curious
Dwarfism
Impulsive
Practical Joker

Backstory
Viveka grew up on the streets as an orphaned child. She kept herself alive be becoming a pickpocket and petty thief. Her whole objective in life is to have fun so that is why she joined a group of friends to go exploring.


Last edited by BobShmob on Sat Nov 27, 2010 10:40 am; edited 1 time in total
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Re: Roleplaying Club Info

Post  azer on Fri Nov 26, 2010 7:56 pm

@ Jon: your character's backstory still makes no sense given the context. You can read and write, but you are not schooled and have never been outside the village before. You have no idea what the Gentleman's League is. Just change that and you will be good to go.

@Marina: Looks great. Just one thing, your Agility cannot be raised past Great, so you might want to change that (I hid the rule in a list of bullet points, so not your fault).
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Re: Roleplaying Club Info

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